Think Out of the Box on this Father’s Day

For years, most sons and daughters are challenged by what they should “buy” for their dad on Father’s Day. Often it is a nice shirt or some other functional gift. That would earn a “medal” for sure but maybe only a bronze because it’s a thing. A silver medal would go to those who verbally expressed gratitude and gave something. But for me, the gold medal goes to the son/daughter who thinks outside of the (gift) box and writes something in addition to giving an object. The written gift never stops giving.

I remember two years ago, on Father’s Day, when I received heartwarming, handwritten cards from our grown twin sons. They were so special I framed them. I read them often and every time it warms my heart and I count my blessings. They also gave me a “thing” with the card but I have long forgotten what that was.

Another out-of-the-box way to celebrate Father’s Day is to think of someone, other than your Father, who may have given you some very valuable advice or supported you in a meaningful way. The person could have been your uncle, grandfather, mentor or just a mature male friend. In any case, it may have even been a road-changer in your life. What about reaching out and communicating your gratitude to this person on Father’s Day?

I read an article in the USA Today this week about Mike Emrick, an extraordinary sportscaster in the hockey world. The piece describes his current mission to write a letter every day to each person who made a difference in his life. He thinks it could take him a year or two to finish. I am certain that many of these people had given him “fatherly” advice and he was most grateful.

So on this Father’s Day, give the gift of gratitude in written form to your Father and anyone else who has made a significant contribution to your life. It will always be the perfect size and color! I promise you it will not only make their day but also enrich their life.

To read the full article about Mike Emrick’s thank-you-card campaign, click here.

With gratitude,
Walter Green

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